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Life On the Spectrum

Meet James

Disclaimer: Autism Speaks Canada utilizes both person-first (person with autism) and identity-first (autistic person) language and recommends respecting the choice of the autistic individual and or family for their preferred choice. Life on the Spectrum shares lived experiences and authentic stories of autistic Canadians from coast to coast to coast. The answers to the questions are provided by the autistic person and or family. We are thankful to the participants for trusting us. We strive to share their stories authentically and respectfully. Information provided on our website is not a recommendation, referral or endorsement of any resource, therapeutic method, or service provider and does not replace the advice of medical, legal or educational professionals. Autism Speaks Canada does not provide medical or legal advice or services. Rather, Autism Speaks Canada provides general information about autism as a service to the community. The information provided on our website is not a recommendation, referral or endorsement of any resource, therapeutic method, or service provider and does not replace the advice of medical, legal or educational professionals. Autism Speaks Canada has not validated and is not responsible for any information, events, or services provided by third parties. 

Meet James

Meet James, a self advocate from Saskatoon, Saskatoon that was diagnosed when he was about 16 and now he’s 31. He is sharing his story to help people understand autism better.

What does it mean to you to be autistic?

It makes it hard to focus on things or concentrate at times. But that means when I truly focus on something, I can give it 100% and push through it.

What are your autism strengths?

I am kind, considerate, and respectable. I get along with most people and like writing in general.

What are some things that are hard for you?

I have a hard time remembering things or focusing, often losing attention with things that I try to do.

What role has your family played in your autism journey?

My family has been super supportive through all my struggles. I’ve grown close to my family because of my autism and they’ve become more understanding of autism as a whole because of it.

What advice would you give to a person, recently diagnosed with autism, wondering what the future holds for them? What are your goals and hopes for the future?

Never give up just because your autism gives you weaknesses in some things. You’ll still be able to find strengths in other things.

What five words best describe you?

Calm, understanding, kind, dependable, fun

Disclaimer: Autism Speaks Canada utilizes both person-first (person with autism) and identity-first (autistic person) language and recommends respecting the choice of the autistic individual and or family for their preferred choice. Life on the Spectrum shares lived experiences and authentic stories of autistic Canadians from coast to coast to coast. The answers to the questions are provided by the autistic person and or family. We are thankful to the participants for trusting us. We strive to share their stories authentically and respectfully. Information provided on our website is not a recommendation, referral or endorsement of any resource, therapeutic method, or service provider and does not replace the advice of medical, legal or educational professionals. Autism Speaks Canada does not provide medical or legal advice or services. Rather, Autism Speaks Canada provides general information about autism as a service to the community. The information provided on our website is not a recommendation, referral or endorsement of any resource, therapeutic method, or service provider and does not replace the advice of medical, legal or educational professionals. Autism Speaks Canada has not validated and is not responsible for any information, events, or services provided by third parties.